The New Credit Card Problem: A College Education

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The New Credit Card Problem: A College Education

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May 14, 2012

Amidst the many financial and economic discussions happening around the United States, there is a serious issue lurking right around the corner. Although mortgage rates are around their all time low and consumer borrowing appears to be extremely cheap, the interest rate on the popular Stafford federal student loan program is set to double in July since the Senate could not reach an agreement on a reasonable way to keep the rate at 3.4%. If it isn't obvious at this point, our politicians will just point the finger at one another for their own political gains, but it's our future students who we need to really start worrying about.

I used to think that people getting into credit card debt was our biggest problem amongst personal financial issues for individuals and couples. Then, we saw a period of time (and we are still feeling the effects of it) where people over mortgaged themselves not truly understanding all of the costs involved with home ownership. Now, I have great concerns about our future students and their ability to really afford a college education. It's hard to reach for the stars when you finish college feeling like you're already 3 feet deep in a 6 foot grave.

It's true that a very high percentage of students who graduate with debt hold a subsidized Stafford loan: 70 percent come from families who make less than $50,000; 24 percent from families with incomes between $50,000 and $100,000; and 6 percent from six-figure-income families. However, there are far more urgent priorities for families with college students specifically that the Pell Grant program has become far more arduous to qualify for when it comes to paying for higher education. (source: www.nytimes.com)

The big question becomes, how can future children get a great college education like they do in many countries without starting off life behind the 8-ball? Several months ago, I wrote how we were close to 100 schools in the United States with endowments 1 billion dollars or more. It's time we set forth limitations on these endowments or force schools that raise this type of money to set aside scholarships commensurate with the dollars they have in the endowment kiddy. Colleges and universities are supposed to be not for profit organizations, but they have to help in the cause of keeping costs down so school is affordable for the next generation.

Perhaps we will end up in a situation where a G.I.Bill part II comes about from the Federal Government. The Government could create some way where younger people get involved in helping out their country for a number of years in exchange for some assistance to get a college education. This was a strategy used to get a workforce of highly skilled workers in the 1940's, some of them getting a really great Ivy league school education. The Government may also set some sort of cap on how fast tuition can rise or maybe loosen the rules on some of these 'for profit' colleges to make the playing field even more competitive.

One other thought to this debate is to reset expectations within the public school system. The schools largely encourage every child to get a college education. I'm all for children getting this education if it makes sense for their career direction. However, some kids should go to technical schools to learn necessary skills for blue collar jobs, some should get straight into the workforce until they are mature enough to make the college experience valuable, and some (a small portion) should go to school and get advanced degrees.

I wish there was an easy answer to this. As a parent myself (14, 12, and 10 year old), I think about this topic all the time. Since I do this for a living, I've done a really good job of saving for my children's education but it still begs the debate about what might be best for each of my kids. No matter what, it's important to recognize that $50,000, $75,000, or $100,000 or more can be devastating to the future of someone 21 or 22 years old starting out in life. With job salaries starting lower and finding work more difficult in the 'college educated' jobs, this student debt has taken over quite possibly as the number one problem that will stop young people from reaching their financial goals.

Should I contribute to my 401(k)? Or pay off my student loan? Should I build a savings account? Or pay off my student loan? Should I buy a home? Or pay off my student loan? If you are a parent of a teenager, start getting a game plan in place today or begin having the discussion on how you both think the college education is going to get paid for down the road. With the arguments going on in Congress, I don't suspect a great solution will come up soon. The best smart money moves for your kids to keep their backpack light because those saddled with lots of debt have a hard time building wealth on the climb to the top of the mountain.

Visit to www.oxygenfinancial.net to request a free consultation with the leading financial experts for people in their 20's, 30's, and 40's in the country.

Written by:

Ted Jenkin, CFP®, AAMS®, AWMA®, CRPC®, CMFC®, CRPS®

Co-CEO and Founder of oXYGen Financial, Inc - The Leaders in Gen X & Y Financial Advice

Securities and Investment Advisory Services offered through NFP Advisor Services, LLC (NFPAS), Member FINRA/SIPC. Oxygen Financial is not affiliated with NFPAS. NFPAS does not provide tax or legal advice. This site is published for residents of the United States only. Registered Representatives and Investment Advisor Representatives of NFP Advisor Services, LLC (NFPAS) may only conduct business with residents of the states and jurisdictions in which they are properly registered. Therefore, a response to a request for information may be delayed. Not all products and services referenced on this site are available in every state and through every representative or advisor listed. For additional information, please contact NFPAS Compliance Department at 512-697-6000. PLEASE NOTE: The information being provided is strictly as a courtesy. When you link to any of the web sites provided here, you are leaving this web site. NFP Advisor Services, LLC makes no representation as to the completeness or accuracy of information provided at these web sites. Nor is NFP Advisor Services, LLC liable for any direct or indirect technical or system issues or any consequences arising out of your access to or your use of third-party technologies, web sites, information and programs made available through this web site. When you access one of these web sites, you are leaving our web site and assume total responsibility and risk for your use of the web sites you are linking to.

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Securities offered through Kestra Investment Services, LLC (Kestra IS), member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory services offered through Kestra Advisory Services, LLC (Kestra AS), an affiliate of Kestra IS. oXYGen Financial is not affiliated with Kestra IS or Kestra AS. Kestra IS and Kestra AS do not provide tax or legal advice.

This site is published for residents of the United States only. Registered Representatives of Kestra IS and Investment Advisor Representatives of Kestra AS may only conduct business with residents of the states and jurisdictions in which they are properly registered. Therefore, a response to a request for information may be delayed. Not all products and services referenced on this site are available in every state and through every representative or advisor listed. For additional information, please contact Kestra IS Compliance Department at 844-553-7872.

PLEASE NOTE: The information being provided is strictly as a courtesy. When you link to any of the web sites provided here, you are leaving this web site. Kestra IS and Kestra AS makes no representation as to the completeness or accuracy of information provided at these web sites. Nor is Kestra IS and Kestra AS liable for any direct or indirect technical or system issues or any consequences arising out of your access to or your use of third-party technologies, web sites, information and programs made available through this web site. When you access one of these web sites, you are leaving our web site and assume total responsibility and risk for your use of the web sites you are linking to.